Brown bottle or green bottle?

Brown bottle or green bottle?

0 2 weeks ago

If you want to drink a refreshing beverage at the end of your day you probably don't really think that much about its bottle. But maybe later or maybe at some unexciting period in your day, you just start having another think of it and realize that you don't know the difference between green and brown bottles in the aspect of storing beer.

You've probably known that there are some main factors that can affect the flavor and freshness of the beverage you drink: age, temperature, light, and oxidization. By storing you can regulate and preserve the freshness of your beer that is the most important thing if you brew and therefore store your own craft beer.

In the most common cases, beer is stored in brown green or clear bottles (not to mention cans this time) and why is that? As you've apparently noticed the light is the enemy of your beer. We have to protect it from direct sunlight in order to prevent the beer from the susceptibility of skunking. At the present time, brewers have the opportunity to preserve the taste by applying UV protected coats to the glass. If you see a beer in clear bottle today the cause is marketing related: the buyer of it can see the color and the texture of the brew. But what about the past?

Although bottled beer was invented in the 16th century, that wasn't a prevalent thing yet back then. Later on, in the 19th century, beer was bottled in clear glass bottles but that wasn't the best option as it turned out later: the beverage began to smell really really bad (UV rays affect the hops and change the flavor of the drink). This is the basic reason why beer bottles developed into colored bottles: to prevent the content inside of it from sunlight. Initially, until the 1930s beer was bottled in green bottles as long as it turned out that brown bottles preserve the freshness of the drink far better.

So how did green bottles came into the picture again? After WWII there was a shortage of brown bottles and green bottles got their green light again. At that time European brewers sold their products at a very expensive price so green bottles became equivalent with high quality (and high priced) beer.