Women also want beer

Women also want beer

2 3 weeks ago

There is a strong possibility that initially women's equality arose in the act of drinking beer. In prior ages priestess, ladies, women, and girls drank beer such as men. In Babylon, they solely drank the beverage at home but in Egypt, there wasn't really a huge difference between man and women in the case of consuming beer. At that time they had the opportunity to have drinks with men in breweries and in social gatherings as well.

The devoured quantity easily beat that we are used to nowadays because they didn't only use beer for drinking but for bathing too. Especially women in Egypt or in Rome. Plinius wrote that their skin became more fresh and soft after regularly beer-baths. In middle ages, the cult of beer continued chiefly when monks started brewing it. Beer suddenly became one of the biggest income sources of the monasteries, the tradition of that has lasted until to the present day in Germany and Belgium. Who is currently planning a trip to these countries and fancy tasting some really good beer don't forget to look up these breweries that have centuries-old traditions.

If we dive into the tradition of drinking beer we quickly find the proof that English women also had a special affection for the beverage. In the royal court, they consumed it between breakfast and lunch and of course before dinner and after it. An almost unwritten law stated that one must drink four pints of beer before the evening meal and three pints of it after. Queen Elisabeth I. drank beer at breakfast and King Henry VIII. allowed 12 liters (!) of beer for his wife on a daily basis. Obviously, his spouses didn't really have the time to worry about the consequences of heavy drinking.